Social Entrepreneurship in Peru

My friend, managing director of I-Dev International, forwarded me the details regarding a winter break 10 day immersion program for students and young professionals interested in social entrepreneurship, microfinance and corporate social responsibility. Some details are below, but you can read all about the opportunity here.

I’m familiar with their work in Cajamarca, and they’re a great, young and dynamic organization with an awesome team.  I really encourage you to check them out.

I-DEV International’s Doing Development In… (DDI) program was created to give young professionals & students from top graduate programs a realistic, first hand view of how grassroots development, microfinance, corporate social responsibility and social venture capital programs are making a difference on the ground, in communities at the base of the pyramid.

This 10 day immersion program, offered in 2 sessions over the winter holidays, provides participants with a unique opportunity to:

  • Meet & Engage with senior management at top international development organizations
  • Learn the on-the-ground challenges of managing corporate social responsibility programs in developing countries
  • Gain an authentic, first hand view into the daily lives and challenges faced by communities at the base of the pyramid
  • Have a truly unforgettable vacation
  • Also, Cajamarca is not a half-bad place to spend some time over winter break:

    First South American thoughts

    I somehow ended up taking a work related week long trip to Peru – made the decision thursday, and here I am! This is exciting for me, as I have never been to South America, and I am beyond thrilled to discover this continent (or at least a tiny part of it). Working for CGSGI, I have been researching and writing about poverty in Peru and Colombia (where we work), but this trip will be an opportunity to get a much more holistic and real understanding of the dynamics at play. In Peru, the stats are staggering: over 40% of the population lives in poverty, and that in spite of strong and sustained economic growth – 9% last year, the highest rate among South American countries. In one of the regions we work in, Cajamarca, mining is the economic engine. Nonetheless, nearly half the children under 5 in that region suffer from chronic malnutrition…. Meanwhile, the central government collected nearly $2 billion in tax revenues from mining companies, but this has failed to translate into improved quality of life for impoverished Peruvians.

    Anyway — I cannot wait to visit the sites of our project work, and to experience it for myself. It’s 2:20 am, and I am wired! 
    In terms of first impressions, the Lima airport at midnight was chock full of American missionaries… There were probably 200 missionaries, mostly middle aged/older people. I have no doubt that they come and do work in good faith here, probably contributing to poverty alleviation in some way or another. Regardless, I have a fundamental issue with aid that is tied to religious proselytizing. Particularly in this part of the world, where Christianity wreaked such havoc. While I was waiting in line at immigration, I kept wondering how the Peruvians perceived this. Perhaps they are despondent, and this is just part of the landscape. Maybe they think Americans are mighty, mighty strange. Who knows. In the mix, we also had an enormous tour group of older Japanese people, most of them wearing those fancy face masks… 
    To finish off, a collection of infuriating stories from this past week: 
    Firestone and workers’ rights violations in Liberia (and their $30 million Superbowl ad…)
    – This isn’t so much infuriating as disappointing – ECOWAS gives $100K to Liberia to fight the invasion of caterpillars which is decimating the country’s agricultural sector. $100K? Seriously? Not that ECOWAS should be giving more, but perhaps more substantial help should be making its way….
    – And, of course, another story of refugee abuse. I long for the day when people fleeing tragedy will be treated with dignity and respect.